feature-amps

We’ve been on the road for nearly two months now and we’ve stayed at various types of sites:  state parks with water AND electric, parks with water OR electric, full hookups with water, electric and sewer, and any of which would have 50 amp or 30 amp power connections. Although, we have not boondocked yet — look for a potential future post :)

When we’re connected to a 50 amp site, we really don’t need to give our electric usage much thought — not that we go hog-wild and run everything at once — but there isn’t a concern we’ll trip a breaker by going about our normal routines.

However, when we are connected to a 30 amp site, we found we need to be a little more mindful of our usage or else we trip a breaker. Which has happened a few times. Therefore we decided to calculate the amperage of all of our common appliances so we’d have a cheat sheet to refer to (we used this site for quick calculations).

Here are our common appliances and the amps they draw:

Rear A/C unit – 16 amps

Front A/C unit – 16 amps

Toaster Oven – 15 amps

Radiant Heater – 12.5 amps

Water Kettle – 12.5 amps

Rice Cooker – 5.6 amps

Exhaust Fan – 3.5 amps

Slow Cooker – 2 amps

Computer (Charging) – 0.7 amps

Radio – 0.25 amps

So when we are connected to a 30 amp circuit, we can have one A/C unit running but not both, and then the slow cooker and the rice cooker for dinner, but we can’t boil water for tea/coffee etc. There are also minimal draws happening in the background when phones are charging, refrigerator, lights, etc. so we factor in a few amps for the unknown.

It’s becoming second nature as to what we can run and when, but we always look forward to knowing when we have 50 amps to work with :)

Join the conversation! 4 Comments

  1. Oh, I totally hear you =)
    “Hunny, can you shut off the heat so I can make coffee?”
    “Hunny, can you shut off the warm water heater AND the heater so I can use the printer?”
    “Can I start the microwave?” – “Not if both computers are on.”
    Etc. :)

    But it is neat when you figure out what works and what doesn’t. I miss 50 amp where I don’t have to think.

    Thanks for the comment on our blog, I will be back here!

    Reply

  2. You need to get out there and boondock! It’s fun to have the freedom and I don’t realize a difference in power from land line vs. the generator. The trick is not forgetting to plug in the chargeable items while it is on. Also, even in 20 degrees running propane for heat, or in 100 degrees running the generator for a/c, we still spend less than most campsites. Many more choices day to day when you’re free of the plug!

    Reply

    • Hey Dusty, thanks for the comment, I really appreciate it.

      And boondocking is definitely on our list…I’m looking forward to making it work actually, as we still have yet to use our generator, heh!

      Reply

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